New Police Commissioner Jim Hammer keynotes Annual Luncheon of the Patrol Special Police

February 2, 2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 2010

(San Francisco, CA) New Police Commissioner Jim Hammer keynotes Annual Luncheon of the Patrol Special Police on Thursday, January 28, 2010

Newly-appointed Police Commissioner Jim Hammer addressed about 50 guests at the Annual Luncheon of the San Francisco Patrol Special Police held on January 28. Hammer said that the Patrol Specials provide one key solution to San Francisco’s crime and safety needs.

Glen Park community leader Ann Grogan was also honored for her community safety leadership and for her educational outreach efforts on behalf of the Patrol Special Police Association.

Hammer, a Castro district resident and attorney, noted that merchants and neighbors who pay for the services of the Patrol Specials, trust and appreciate their dedicated patrols and rapid response. He pointed out the exemplary patrol service of Officer Jane Warner who has served the Castro for over 18 years.

Grogan was awarded a Certificate of Recognition by the Patrol Specials, by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, and by the State Board of Equalization for her contribution to community awareness of the Patrol Special Police, and as a member of the small business community for over twenty years. Grogan owns a home-based Internet fashion business called Romantasy Corsetry.

In late 2008 Grogan organized a small group of residents in Glen Park who were concerned about an increasing crime rate in the formerly bucolic neighborhood. The group surveyed 2000 households and businesses, gathered subscriptions, and hired their first-ever Patrol Special Police Officer.

Officer Calvin Wiley initially patrolled the neighborhood two to four hours, five evenings a week. The program has now expanded to seven days a week.

“We hope to be able to afford a full-time patrol sometime soon this year, and we plan to expand our efforts to be helpful in other ways, such as sponsoring a series of safety awareness/self defense classes,” said Grogan.

A former State Attorney, Grogan said the awards were the high point of her business career, similar to an award she received from the California Highway Patrol for a legal case she had won in the past.

“We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” Grogan quoted World War II Prime Minister Winston Churchill to the officers of the Patrol Special Police after receiving her recognition. She thanked the Patrol Specials for giving back to clients and entire neighborhoods “peace of mind, freedom to go about our business and our lives being productive, and giving back what criminals and wrong-doers would take away such as our spirit and zest for life.”

Grogan told the audience when accepting her awards that each person in the room provided one link in the chain of success for the Patrol Specials and for continued community safety. She pointed out that each person was and could be a leader, and that each person’s actions and words count to promote the success of the Patrol Specials as a cost-effective, crime-prevention neighborhood policing service.

Supervisorial candidates Rebecca Prosen and Starchild of District 8 and Debora Walker of District 6 attended the luncheon, and KRON 4 News reporter Dave Guingona was Master of Ceremonies. The event was organized by San Francisco Patrol Special Police Officer Hanley Chan.

About San Francisco Patrol Special Police

San Francisco Patrol Special Police are the only private neighborhood safety service in the city that is legally permitted to patrol San Francisco’s streets as well as private locations, under the city’s municipal code Sec. 1750, and is on police radio frequencies. Patrol Special Police officers are screened by background checks conducted by the S.F.P.D., are trained annually at the San Francisco Police Academy, and regulated by the Police Commission.

Throughout more than a century-and-a-half of unique neighborhood policing, Special Police have supported the City’s public safety needs. Patrol Special Police date their history from 1851, during Gold Rush Days. The force was written into the City Charter in 1856. Special Police have assisted city authorities with controlling historical criminal gangs such as the infamous Hounds of San Francisco. Over the years they also maintained public safety during labor strikes, riots, and natural disasters – including the devastating 1906 earthquake.

Today, Patrol Special Police augment the S.F.P.D. by providing neighborhoods with cost-effective and crime prevention services and safety education. Patrol Special Police resolve disturbances at an early stage with a view toward the welfare of all. Their early intervention and visible presence unburden S.F.P.D. officers to address other law enforcement needs. Their services are financed by private clients who include merchants, professionals, homeowners’ associations, individual residents, street fair and special event organizers, government agencies, and other business and private organizations.

Contact: Patrol Special Police Officer Jane Warner #2926 Phone: (415) 559-9955 Email: sfpatrol@earthlink.net Chair, Special Neighborhood Policing http://www.sfspecialneighborhoodpolicing.org
President, Association of Patrol Special Police Officers http://sfpatrolspecpolice.com/

Photographs from the event are available.
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SFPSP officer protection legislation

January 7, 2010

Introduced by District 8 Supervisor Bevan Dufty, January 5, 2010.

[Penalties for assaulting or battering a patrol special officer.]

Resolution encouraging the Chief of the San Francisco Police Department to consider imposition of increased potential penalties for individuals who commit assault or battery on a patrol special police officer.

WHEREAS, patrol special officers are regulated by the Police Commission and the Chief of the San Francisco Police Department as determined by the San Francisco Charter and the California Penal Code; and

WHEREAS, patrol special officers patrol certain beats and territories to maintain and improve public safety; and

WHEREAS, patrol special officers risk being deliberately assaulted or battered in the course of their work and victims merit special consideration when imposing a sentence so as to display condemnation for violent crime; and

WHEREAS, numerous sections of state and local penal law provide increased potential penalties for certain occupations when employees are victims of assault or battery during their work including, for example, emergency medical technicians, peace officers, nurses, traffic officers and more; now, therefore, be it

RESOLVED that the City and County of San Francisco encourages the appropriate governing authorities take the necessary steps to increase the potential penalties for those who commit assaults or batteries on patrol special officers while the patrol special officers are acting within the limited scope of their duty; and be it

FURTHER RESOLVED that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to Chief of Police and Police Commission.


Man in Patrol Special case makes bail

January 7, 2010

by Cynthia Laird

c.laird@ebar.com

The man who was charged with assault in connection with a Christmas Day melee that left San Francisco Patrol Special Police Officer Jane Warner with a broken arm has made bail, according to the district attorney’s office.

James Crayton McCullough, 60, of San Francisco, pleaded not guilty to a variety of charges at his arraignment December 31. Brian Buckelew, director of legal affairs and public information for the district attorney’s office, said that at the time of his arraignment, McCullough’s bail was raised to $250,000 and he was handcuffed and taken into custody.

But on January 4, McCullough made bail.

Buckelew did say that several stay-away orders were issued, however, meaning that McCullough cannot go to the Castro District or the Badlands or Trigger bars. The Castro is defined in the order as being bounded by Dolores, 14th, Market, Diamond, and 19th streets, Buckelew said.

McCullough’s attorney, Jeremy Blank, told the Bay Area Reporter that his client “feels terrible” about what happened to Warner.

“He is quite distraught about the injury she suffered,” Blank said Tuesday. “He has been a long-standing member of the Castro community for 20 years.”

Blank said that he is continuing to investigate the incident and is looking for additional witnesses.

Blank also said that McCullough’s residence is outside of the Castro, and it is not covered by the stay-away order.

“But he certainly is a member of the community,” Blank said.

As reported online last week in the BAR, the incident started at around 1:14 a.m. December 25. Warner and Patrol Special Police Officer John Adamsons were checking in with security outside the Cafe when they were approached by a young man who alerted them that a fight was brewing at Trigger, Warner said.

Immediately, Adamsons and Warner crossed Market Street to check out the situation. They found McCullough leaning up against a parked car outside of the trendy club yelling, “fucking assholes,” at the doormen, Warner said. McCullough appeared to be intoxicated and she noticed a gash in his head that was bleeding, she said. McCullough became verbally and physically hostile, and attempted to push Warner away from him when she began to ask him if he needed help, Warner told the B.A.R.

Without warning McCullough then charged the doormen. Warner said that she stepped between them and attempted to hold him back while telling him he was under arrest. Within a few moments McCullough attacked Warner. She protected herself with her baton, hitting McCullough twice before she felt his fist on her left arm and she fell to the ground in pain. Warner immediately called for assistance over the police radio, she said.

McCullough was later taken into custody.

Warner, who estimates that she’ll be recovering for a couple of months, is nonetheless back out on the street.

“I’m out there walking,” she said, adding that she is accompanied by another patrol special officer.

She said that the same security services are being offered to her clients, which are various Castro merchants.

In a related matter, Supervisor Bevan Dufty is expected to request that legislation be drafted that would add enhancements for battery or assault on a patrol special officer, similar to what was done for Department of Parking and Traffic officers.

Warner also writes the B.A.R.‘s crime column, which she plans to resume once she has recovered.

Anyone who witnessed the incident can call Blank at (415) 710-2728.

01/07/2010

Bay Area Reporter: http://www.ebar.com/news/article.php?sec=news&article=4456


Dufty urges protections for patrol specials

January 6, 2010

By: Joshua Sabatini
Examiner Staff Writer
01/06/10 8:10 AM PST

Supervisor Bevan Dufty introduced a resolution Tuesday urging protections for the 161-year-old Patrol Special Police, who are overseen by the San Francisco Police Department.

Dufty said this group is not afforded the same protections of other workers and wants to see that change, ensuring that the penalties for assaulting the patrol specials in the line of duty are as severe as for assaulting police officers, animal control officers and parking control officers, among others.

He told a story about a recent incident, in which Patrol Special Officer Jane Warner was assaulted in the line of duty outside of an establishment on Market Street on Christmas Day. An individual who was intoxicated — who had previously been arrested two years earlier for an assault outside of a bar in the Castro — had been in a brawl. When she went to assist him, he assaulted her and broke her arm.

It sounds like the District Attorney isn’t taking the assault lightly. Dufty said the guy was hit with nine counts.

“I’m introducing today a resolution which asks the Police Commission and the Chief of Police to take actions that would provide the same protections” that exist for the “San Francisco police department officers and a number of others who are protected under state code from being assaulted in the line of duty,” he said.

San Francisco Examiner: http://www.sfexaminer.com/opinion/blogs/under-the-dome/Dufty-urges-protections-for-patrol-specials–80771162.html


Clients are highly satisfied with San Francisco Patrol Special Police, survey finds

January 5, 2010

Patrol Special police reported on January 4, 2010, enthusiastic support by their private business and residential clients for their special supplementary policing services that are service-oriented and responsive to merchant and resident concerns. Public police are facing layoffs in San Francisco as well as cutbacks in use of expensive overtime announced in December.

Clients surveyed by Professor Edward Stringham, noted economist from San Jose State University, reported an “overwhelming support” for the fast response time and friendly, professional demeanor of the Patrol Special Police. They reported that Patrol Specials provide policing that public police have no time to provide and in some cases, do not have the organizational culture to provide. Patrol Special Police are viewed as proactive to prevent small incidents from becoming large, expensive crimes. See full press release here.

Then link the word “here” to:
http://www.sfspecialneighborhoodpolicing.org/articles/1-4-10%20Comprehensive%20Survey.html


Patrol Special officer injured in Christmas melee

December 31, 2009

by Heather Cassell

heather@whimsymedia.com

Christmas morning wasn’t merry for San Francisco Patrol Special Police Officer Jane Warner, who suffered a broken arm during an altercation with a man who was subsequently arrested on a variety of charges.

Taken into custody was James Crayton McCullough, 60, of San Francisco. McCullough was later released on bail, but the district attorney’s office will be asking that he be remanded at his arraignment today (Thursday, December 31).

Brian Buckelew, director of legal affairs and public information for the district attorney’s office, said Wednesday that McCullough faces nine charges, including assault with force likely to cause great bodily injury, battery, two counts of resisting arrest, two counts of criminal threats, and three misdemeanors.

The incident started at around 1:14 a.m. December 25. Warner and Patrol Special Police Officer John Adamsons were checking in with security outside the Cafe when they were approached by a young man who alerted them that a fight was brewing at Trigger, Warner said.

Immediately, Adamsons and Warner crossed Market Street to check out the situation. They found McCullough leaning up against a parked car outside of the trendy club yelling, “fucking assholes,” at the doormen, Warner said. McCullough appeared to be intoxicated and she noticed a gash in his head that was bleeding, she said. McCullough became verbally and physically hostile, and attempted to push Warner away from him when she began to ask him if he needed help, Warner told the B.A.R.

Without warning McCullough then charged the doormen. Warner said that she stepped between them and attempted to hold him back while telling him he was under arrest. Within a few moments McCullough attacked Warner. She protected herself with her baton, hitting McCullough twice before she felt his fist on her left arm and she fell to the ground in pain. Warner immediately called for assistance over the police radio, she said.

Police officers and an ambulance quickly arrived at the scene and officers found McCullough handcuffed and yelling, according to the police report obtained by the B.A.R.

McCullough screamed, “I’m going to shoot you, I’m going to kill you fucking cops!” at the police at the scene, according to the report.

Warner, 53, was taken to San Francisco General Hospital.

McCullough allegedly continued resisting arrest, lodging himself into the floor of the patrol car. He attempted to spit at the officers and threatened to kill them as they took him to Mission Station. As officers attempted to book McCullough, he screamed at officers, “I’m going to die in four minutes, so kill me anyway. Motherfucking cops! I am a diabetic.”

Police officers took McCullough to San Francisco General Hospital, where he allegedly threatened to kill a nurse and had to be restrained in order to receive treatment, according to the report.

Tough end to tough year

This isn’t the way Warner wanted to start 2010. She was happy to be back on her beat patrolling the Castro after spending part of 2009 recovering from ovarian cancer.

“Jane had a tough year in 2009 and no one is more deserving for good luck and good wishes [for the coming year],” said District 8 Supervisor Bevan Dufty.

“She’s so loved. She puts the community’s safety ahead of her own,” Dufty added.

The district attorney’s office will “aggressively investigate the incident,” said Dufty, who with Warner and other Castro merchants plan to seek a permanent stay away order for McCullough.

Openly gay Police Commissioner James Hammer, who is a former assistant district attorney, also wished Warner well in her recovery.

“Police work is dangerous whether you are a patrol special or a police officer,” said Hammer, who was once a reserve police officer. “Jane and the other patrol specials add a whole other sense of visibility or added security … hands-on attention to a neighborhood.”

Mission Station Captain Greg Corrales said he plans to “step up patrols while Jane is on medical leave” and Warner said additional patrol special police officers will also be on duty.

Warner also writes the B.A.R.‘s crime column, which she plans to resume once she has recovered.

12/31/2009

Bay Area Reporter: http://www.ebar.com/news/article.php?sec=news&article=4445


Clients say city’s Patrol Special Police effective and welcome

December 16, 2009

Many satisfied San Francisco Patrol Special Police clients across the city enthusiastically attest to the effective and welcome nature of our particular, responsive, trusted neighborhood policing model. Those clients have recently and heartily endorsed our services in an independent academic survey conducted by Professor Edward Stringham of San Jose State University. (Preliminary results reported by Professor Stringham via email to the Patrol Special Police, October 2009.)

Professor Stringham conducted a survey of about 1/5 of our total city-wide clients and received an amazing return rate of 43 percent. He found that:

1. The Patrol Special Police provide services that members of the S.F.P.D. do not provide.

2. The S.F.P.D. does not respond quickly to many types of calls whereas the Patrol Special Police do.

3. Crime is viewed as a problem, and the Patrol Special Police are seen as a proactive rather than a reactive solution to that problem.

In addition, 97 percent of survey respondents answered “Yes” when asked, “Does your Patrol Special Police Officer make your neighborhood a more friendly and safe place?” He concluded that the Patrol Special Police provide services that are highly desired and make San Francisco safer. For a copy of the client survey report, please contact: sfpatrol@earthlink.net.